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Speeding Tickets Archives

Can a driver refute an officer's claim of speeding?

Law enforcement officials have many ways of catching speeding drivers in New York. They may sit on the sides of roads with their laser guns at the ready, prepared to catch speeders in the crosshairs of their devices. Or, they may drive along highways and visibly witness what they believe to be speeding vehicles on the road. These are only some of the tools and techniques that officers may employ to catch drivers who are breaking the law.

Protect driving rights with strong defense

Not long ago, this blog discussed using an emergency as a defense to a speeding allegation. While some defenses may give drivers the option of pleading down or overcoming the legal claims against them, others may not be effective in protecting their right to drive. Therefore, having a defensive strategy before going to court can be important if one wants to maintain their driving privileges.

Is an emergency a good defense to a speeding ticket?

When a person exceeds the posted speed limit, they may be considered speeding. Speeding is punishable under the law, and when a New York driver accumulates too many points based on speeding, they may lose their driving privileges. While an individual may believe that their need to address or avoid an emergency is a good justification for speeding, they should understand that it may not always be accepted as a valid excuse.

New York works with other states to catch speeding drivers

A speeding ticket is a nuisance at best and a serious legal matter at worst. New York drivers who have been stopped for allegedly speeding on New York roads understand the stress and financial strain that accumulating tickets may have. Too many speeding tickets can lead to the loss of one's driving privileges, financial penalties in the form of fines, and even time in jail.

Is "driving the speed of traffic" a defense to speeding?

Controlled highways throughout New York have posted speed limits that reach up to 65 miles per hour. However, anyone who has spent time on the highways of the state will know that traffic is often moving well in excess of that established ceiling. Some people believe that it is far safer to speed to keep up with other vehicles when in traffic than it is to drive the speed limit or lower and be the slowest vehicle on the road.

Helping you to fight a speeding ticket

Driving is a privilege that many New Yorkers enjoy, but it is also one that many need to keep their lives moving forward. The ability to use one's own car to get to their job and transport family members to school and other locations is important to those who enjoy their independence, but it can also be vital for many who must be able commute to work to provide for themselves and their family. As readers of this blog know, tickets and other sanctions can threaten drivers' rights when it comes to maintaining their licenses.

Drivers may have more points taken away the faster they speed

When playing a video game, a person may wish to drive as fast as possible to get the most points they can. However, drivers in New York are probably aware that fast driving and points are not good for their driving records. In fact, when a driver accumulates too many points on their license, they may lose their driving privileges.

Is reckless driving treated the same as a speeding ticket?

Different offenses can result in different types of criminal charges. This can be particularly confusing for a New York resident who has not had the need to understand the rules of driving beyond testing to get their driver's license. For example, different speeding offenses may be charged differently, depending upon the alleged actions of the driver.

Can I be sent to jail for speeding?

Under the law, a New York driver is speeding if they operate their car above the posted speed limit in a particular area or zone. Therefore, a person driving 27 miles per hour in a 25 miles per hour zone is speeding, but it is a stretch of logic to suggest that this person should face the same penalties as someone who drove 90 miles per hour in a 45 miles per hour speed zone.

Speed limits change on controlled highways

One of the few places that a New Yorker can legally drive 65 miles per hour is on a controlled highway, and only then if the location where they are operating their vehicle is posted as having such a limit. In the state of New York, highways and interstates can have different speeds in different places and it is up to drivers to know and recognize when speed limits change.

Call 212-257-8321 to receive a free, no-obligation ticket evaluation from The Law Office of Craig Bondy or reach us by email.

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